skip to main page content CETIS: Click here to return to the homepage
the centre for educational technology interoperability standards

skip over the long navigation bar
Home
News
Features
Events
Forums
Reference
Briefings
Press centre

Inside Cetis
what is Cetis?
Contact us
Cetis staff
Jobs at CETIS


 




Syndication
XML: Click here to get the news as an RSS XML file XML: Click here to get the news as an Atom XML file iCAL: Click here to get the events as an iCalendar file

Background
what are learning technology standards?
who's involved?
who's doing what?

CETIS Groups
what are cetis groups?
what difference can they make?
Assessment SIG
Educational Content SIG
Enterprise SIG
Metadata SIG
Life Long Learning Group
Portfolio SIG
Accessibility Group
Pedagogy Forum
Developer's forum

Subjects
Accessibility (310)
Assessment (74)
Content (283)
Metadata (195)
Pedagogy (34)
Profile (138)
Tools (197)
For Developers (569)
For Educators (344)
For Managers (339)
For Members (584)
SCORM (118)
AICC (18)
CEN (34)
DCMI (36)
EML (47)
IEEE (79)
IMS (302)
ISO (21)
OAI (24)
OKI (20)
PROMETEUS (12)
W3C (37)

Do we need a another reference model?

Posted on August 09 2002 by Gerry Graham in reponse to Experts question SCORM's pedagogic value

I don't think anyone would deny that SCORM is a step in the right direction, but let's remember what it is. It is a collection of specifications, or books using the ADL analogy, gathered together, tweaked and modified to suit a particular context - a single learner interacting with content presented through an LMS. Do this suit a formal education setting? No. But that isn't a problem.

Another way of looking at SCORM is a collection of application profiles. If we in an education context wish to create new application profiles to suit, for example for metadata we are free to do so. What we should learn from SCORM is that we need to do this in a systematic way, not in isolation or with too narrow a focus.

If we decided it right to create a new reference model we would probably choose to reuse most of the SCORM, tweak bits and add to it.

So yes, I would agree that SCORM's pedagogic model is questionable but it is not the end of the road. We are free to set our own path - as long as it is built on internationally accepted principles such as the core elements of SCORM.

SCORM may be a collection of 'books' but its no Bible. There will be no devine retribution for tampering here!

Gerry

Replies to this post:

copyright cetis.ac.uk
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

syndication |publisher's statement |contact us |privacy policy

 go to start of page content